Cody’s 2018 Base Build: Block 2 Recap

Cody’s 2018 Base Build: Block 2 Recap

  • January 8, 2018
  • Blog

The second block of my off-season Base Build consumed the month of December. As we all know, the window of time between Thanksgiving and New Years is always a challenge. End of year business deadlines, family time, social activities, training time, and weather are all pieces in the “Life Puzzle” that must be assembled in this month of the year. I’m pleased to report that most of my pieces were large and few in numbers, so my puzzle went together with relative ease and success.

On the training front, I’m continuing to make some solid progress and I’m loving every minute of it.

Strength Training

As mentioned before, in my Block 1 Recap, Strength Training is going to be large part of my annual training program throughout my entire season. I’m turning 40 this year and I can really feel the effects of not strength training compared to the overall health and “feeling good” that comes with strength training. I don’t have any evidence to back it up, but I truly believe there are positive chemical/hormonal effects in the body when you lift heavy weights. I feel this is particularly valuable to take advantage of as we age. Kind of an “anti-aging” type thing: keep the muscles and hormones firing on all cylinders and we resist the degradation and slow the effects of getting older.

Use It or Lose It!

That said, Block 2 Strength Training consisted of continued strength building. Where Block 1 established a foundation of movement strength and got me passed the feeling of post-workout soreness with relative light loads, Block 2 began to pile on some weight. Over the 3 weeks I progressively increased the loads in my primary movements: the back squat & deadlift for the lower body; reaching a “peak set” set of reps in the last week at 95% of my one rep max.  For my “push-pull” upper body movements in this block I focused on the bench press and pull-up combo; also achieving some solid gains with a 160 lbs bench press and 5 sets of 10 strict pull ups.

Aerobic Training

For Block 2 I kept the same pattern of Strength Day, Trainer Day, Endurance Day as described in my Block 1 Recap. On the bike the focus moved from basic Aerobic Threshold (AeT) work I did in Block 1 to “Aerobic-Strength” work as a progression towards increased loads. The progression here is layering in the big-gear low-cadence component for the strength aspect, while maintaining aerobic HRs.

The goal was to train the heart in Block 1, followed by the muscles in Block 2, for maximum aerobic-strength development.

Trainer sessions included extended single-leg ILT work which also focused on large muscle recruitment with bigger gears at 60 rpm and increasing average power outputs over the 3 weeks. After the single-leg work, came the longer Aerobic-Strength intervals that consisted of standing up in nearly my largest gear, pedaling at around 55 rpm. Beginning with 4×5:00 in the first week and progressing to 3×8:00, 2×12:00, 2×15:00 and finally 1×30:00 in the final week to maximize muscular endurance. In week 3 we also added in some short surges at the end of the long intervals to introduce some higher power work (and make the time go by faster) by surging to 70 rpm for 15-seconds each minute. Good times!

Get the FULL details & specifics of our off-season Base Builder Trainer Series.

My outdoor endurance rides progressed along nicely in the first couple weeks of Block 2 while the Denver winter was slow to arrive. By mid-month however the temps finally dropped, we got a little snow, and the outdoor riding options decreased significantly in the final 10 days of so of my training block. This happens, and it happens nearly like clockwork every late December in Denver, so I was ready with a Plan B: more trainer time!

When things get unappealing outside, I bring them inside. For intended longer endurance rides, I trim the quantity and boost the quality just a bit to achieve the desired training stress (TSS) for the day.

For example: if the plan calls for a 4-hour ride at low intensity and 175 TSS, and it is snowing outside…

I take my ride indoors and do 2-hours with 2×30:00 at Aerobic Threshold HR/power as the main set. This alteration, along with a warm-up spin, a few sets of ILTs on both sides of the mainset, and a warm-down spin, and I still get my aerobic training and hit around that 175 TSS target for the day. Not too bad. Other options can also include subbing other activities like running or xc-skiing, but since I’m not running this year and skiing is a bit of a time suck, the trainer is my preferred method. If snow-day trainer rides were to become the norm, I would certainly seek the other alternatives out for more variation.

The trainer session example above is exactly what Kathy and I did on Christmas Eve when it was too cold and sloppy to get outside. Similarly, the day after Christmas we doubled up on the two trainer sessions we offered at the S:6 Wahoo Kickr Studio as part of Week 7 of the 2018 Off-Season Base Builder Program that day.

Then came the big day of the “Quad-Trainer” session that Will Foley, a 20-year-old athlete I coach, and I did on December 28th. On this day we decided to smash ourselves with all four trainer sessions in the studio!

Each sessions was the same and consisted of spin-ups to warm-up, ILT strength work, 30 minutes aerobic-strength climb with 10 surges in last 10 minutes (to 175% FTP), and a 5:00 spin to finish it off. Here’s a brief rundown of that day…

  • 6:30 AM – Early rise, slow to warm-up, but not so bad.

  • 12:00 PM – After a big breakfast and a nap, feeling solid.

  • 4:30 PM – Power numbers are up and feeling strong!

  • 6:15 PM – Barely held on through the surges as muscular strength was fading fast and fast twitch fibers were nearly exhausted.

Despite relatively low-intensity training (HR only exceeded 150 bpm briefly with the surging), this was a monster muscular endurance day, and I felt the fatigue for the next few days. Totals on the day amounted to:

  • Five hours of total riding time

  • Two hours of big gear, low cadence, standing “climbing”

  • Forty 15-second surges over 175% FTP

  • Sixty minutes of pedaling w/ one leg

  • Thirty minutes of pedaling over 120 rpm

  • approx. 80 miles

  • 10,000 feet climbing equivalent

  • 368 TSS

This big day capped off my Block 2 Build with a nice exclamation point and I was now ready to recover for a few days before performing our Testing Protocol at week 8 of the off-season Build Program.

Week 8 Testing

After three easy days of recovery it was time for our second test of the my off-season base build. Our testing protocol consists of a 20-minute sub-max aerobic test, followed by three short duration anaerobic power intervals to see where the top-end is at and determine my new Fatigue Rate, track progress, and re-set training zones for blocks 3 & 4 of the program.

Get the FULL scoop on our Testing Protocol. 

My last test (first test of the 2018 off-season training season) was back in late October. As mentioned, in previous post, the results were quite dismal due to the extended break from/low-level of training I did through the end of summer and early fall.  So progress was anticipated simply from the boosted training volume, effort and structure…and gains we seen. Here’s the recap…

  • 20:00 Aerobic Threshold Power @ 148 bpm
    • Pre-Test 2017:  238w
    • Week 8: 256w
    • Recent “Best” from Summer 2015:  274w
  • 1:00 Max Power
    • Fall 2017:  499w
    • Week 8: 505w
    • Summer 2015:  529w
  • 2:00 Max Power
    • Fall 2017:  380w
    • Week 8: 403w
    • Summer 2015:  454w
  • 4:00 Max Power
    • Fall 2017:  324w
    • Week 8: 340w
    • Summer 2015:  382w
  • Fatigue Rate
    • Fall 2017:  8.7%
    • Week 8: 8.17%
    • Summer 2015:  6.9%
  • This calculates an FTP of
    • Fall 2017:  247w (3.70 w/kg)
    • Week 8: 263w (3.89 w/kg)
    • Summer 2015:  308w (4.71 w/kg)

Conclusion

My first 8 weeks of my off-season Base Build program has been very consistent and successful. I’ve increased my movement strength via increased loads in weight training, and I’ve improved my power on the bike, aerobic power and FTP, by roughly 8%. A solid start to the training season and progress that I intend to continue to make over the coming months.

A steady and consistent build is the key to creating a solid off-season base from which you can further build your race specific fitness later in the year.

My coming blocks of training include continued strength work, building towards peak movement strength in another 3-4 weeks; continued progressions on the bike in terms of duration of long rides and intensity of structured sessions. Simply said, long rides will get longer, while intervals will get a little shorter and more powerful as I begin to train my Anaerobic Threshold energy system.

Now on to Block 3!

Thanks for reading. I hope you enjoyed the insights and follow along for the 2018 season!

Cody Waite, Professional Off-Road Endurance Athlete & Coach
Follow me on Instagram & Facebook
Check out my Stock Training Plans, Custom Training Plans & Personal Coaching options to help you make the most of your training!

 

 

 

Shop Rudy Project for the best helmets & eyewear for the most demanding athletes. Use code: s6racing at checkout and receive 50-62% discount on all their gear.

 

Cody’s Block 1 Recap

Cody’s Block 1 Recap

  • December 12, 2017
  • Blog

My off season training began the first week of November with a my pre-season testing to identify baselines and set accurate zones. Then followed that up with a week long trip to Arizona for the first of three Off-Season Training Camps. This first camp was more of a Training Camp Lite, as my fitness wasn’t in place for any real long rides or heavy training. Rather the goal was to return to consistent daily riding to find my rhythm, clear my mind, and get focused on training for the year ahead. I hit up 2-3 hours each day of riding for the sake of riding and having fun. No intervals, no thresholds to keep an eye on…just ride and enjoy!

Upon my return home I was ready to get to work with Block 1 of our Sessions:6 Off-Season Base Build Training Program.

You can read more about what we do in Block 1 in a previous post HERE.

My off-season training blocks are set up in the common 3-1 pattern of three weeks building fitness (ie. fatigue) followed by a week to de-load a bit to recover and absorb the training (ie. regain freshness). Off-Season Program Block 1 is very low intensity and focuses on adapting to strength training and gaining an aerobic base on the bike.

I’m a fan of routine. With a busy work, family and training schedule, developing a weekly schedule to follow helps me plan and stay consistent. I am also fortunate enough to be able to set up my work schedule as needed and get in more training time during the week than most folks. For this reason my weekly schedule varies slightly from those that we coach and train.

Here’s my typical training week* through the Off-Season:

  • Monday: Strength Day
  • Tuesday: Structured Ride (intervals, usually on the trainer)
  • Wednesday: Endurance (outside when weather is good, trainer when not good)
  • Thursday: Strength Day
  • Friday: Structured Ride (intervals, try for outdoors, trainer is cool too)
  • Saturday: Endurance (outside when weather is good, trainer when not good)
  • Sunday: “Flex Day” (these days riding with my 14-year old MTB racer daughters, or recovery ride, or day off)

*For “recovery” weeks, I’ll drop the structured ride in favor of easy recovery or endurance riding as desired.

These schedule works well for me. It allows for relatively low-volume (ranging from 10 hours early in off-season to highs around 20 hours in peak endurance training in summer months), twice weekly strength, twice weekly aerobic intensity, twice weekly endurance riding, along with plenty of recovery time.

Strength Training

On the strength side, I really let things go over the summer and regretfully didn’t maintain my strength gains from 2017 Off-Season Program very well. I ended up dialing back my loads (using our Strength Load Calculator) a bit to find the correct balance between challenging myself and not over-doing it. For the first three blocks of training, our program focuses specifically on the Deadlift and Back Squat to build cycling specific strength through knee and hip extension. In addition, we include a progression of Pull & Push movements for the upper body, as well as a lot core stability exercises for the back, abdominal, hip and shoulder muscles.

I ended up reducing my 1 rep max lift loads by about 20% over the maxes I achieved last off-season to set my training set/rep schemes.  I may end up reaching my maxes from last season by the end of the build, but the early scheme just felt too heavy, due to my lack of maintenance through the summer. I won’t make that mistake again!

We put far more focus on proper form and full range of motion over what numbers we can achieve. I always remind myself, and those we coach & train, we are endurance athletes training for endurance events, not weight lifters training for competitions; numbers don’t matter as much as proper form to engage all muscles appropriately which will help us achieve higher power outputs across all energy systems as well as build fatigue resistance.

  • 2017 1 Rep Maxes:
    • Back Squat at 200 lbs.
    • Deadlift at 220 lbs.
  • Adjusted 2018 1 Rep Max estimates:
    • Back Squat at 160 lbs.
    • Deadlift at 180 lbs.

I trained strength two times a week: Mondays & Thursdays. Rep schemes for Block 1 ranged from 50% to a peak of 1 set of 4 at 85% in the first session of week 3. The majority of weight lifted was in the 60-75% of 1RM range to build some strength volume and prepare the body for the heavier loads that follow in Block 2. By week 4 recovery week I am feeling strong and healthy. I truly believe that lifting heavy weights (for endurance athletes) helps to maintain a youthfulness that is unachievable through just riding your bike. I’m convinced there is hormonal change that occurs when lifting weights and it helps the body not only stay strong, but just feel better, recover faster, and stay healthier. I encourage all endurance athletes to lift heavy weights, and do it year ’round.

Aerobic Training

The weather has been unusually warm and dry thus far this Fall in Denver. This has allowed me to get outside a bit more than planned for. I’ve been able to get outside on the bike 3-4 days a week, in addition to one day on the trainer. I’m a HUGE fan of training on the trainer, regardless of weather. The quality is unmatched. However, I’ve been training (on the trainer) and racing for 20 years now, and I’m not going to really get any better. My pedaling efficiency is as good as it’s going to get, so spending time training high-cadence and single-leg drills aren’t going to do much for me. Sad but true. I will benefit more from just riding to stay loose and regain a cyclist aerobic base. All that said, I still want to maintain a weekly trainer session in first three blocks for “maintenance” work in the cadence and ILT work. If you have less than 20 years of trainer cadence and ILT drill in your legs, then you need to be on the trainer 2x a week! They will make you better.

My “Structured Ride” days (Tue & Fri) have been made up of Aerobic Threshold Intervals. Spending more and more time at just under 80%  of my max HR helps to build that aerobic power and fat-burning energy system simultaneously. It’s also an extremely time efficient way to get “aerobic miles” in without spending hours and hours and the bike (something else I also do not need with 20 years of high level training in my legs and heart).  These kinds of intervals are moderate in effort and actually pretty fun to do. They take enough focus to stay engaged in the effort, but they are not particularly fatiguing and they start to feel good as you get better at them.

My Endurance days have been just in the 2-3 hour range of easy to moderate effort riding. A mix of MTB and road. I’ve also, for the first time in 6 years, added in a weekly group ride with some of the faster “racers” in town. This hour long ride segment includes some brief periods of high-intensity riding to keep up with the front group. The first week was a bit of shocker (particularly with a 44t front ring), but I quickly found my old “road racing” legs and have been enjoying hanging with the group on Saturday mornings as part of longer ride.

Conclusion

Already after the first block of training I feel lighter and stronger on the bike. I’d guess my FTP has increased around 10 watts, just by the feel of it. My AeT intervals have gone from 240-250w to 260-270w for the 5-10 minute durations I’m targeting at this point. As I write this at the end of my recovery week after a 2.5 hour MTB ride, I don’t feel wiped out and in need of nap. This lets me know I’m adapting well and gaining fitness. Feeling the positive adaptions is crucial, as is seeing the numbers in my training log.

For the numbers geeks out there, in my Training Peaks Performance Management Chart I can also see I’m gaining fitness at a rate of around 5 CTL per week through Block 1. This will decrease a bit in Block 2 onwards, as the initial large fitness gain (20 CTL in the month of Nov.) is  partly due to the lower than normal starting point from being “out of shape”. From here forward a CTL increase of around 10 per month will be my target. I know from history that this is a good rate I can adapt to and not be stretched too thin. I’m starting Block 2 at 80 CTL and the plan is to reach a peak of 120 CTL by end of March. 110-120 has historically been a “high” for me that I can achieve with positive effects. Then from here I’ll have 5 weeks to decrease from 120 to around 100-105 as I PEAK for my early season target event in early May: USAC Marathon National Championships.

Now on to Block 2!

Thanks for reading. I hope you enjoyed the insights and follow along for the 2018 season!

Cody Waite, Professional Off-Road Endurance Athlete & Coach
Follow me on Instagram & Facebook
Check out my Stock Training Plans, Custom Training Plans & Personal Coaching options to help you make the most of your training!

 

 

 

Shop Rudy Project for the best helmets & eyewear for the most demanding athletes. Use code: s6racing at checkout and receive 50-62% discount on all their gear.
Getting Ready For 2018

Getting Ready for 2018

  • November 7, 2017
  • Blog

After a crazy busy summer (mentioned in previous post), things are finally coming back together for Fall. Kathy and I both had an amazing experience over the last few months being a part of the NICA sanctioned Colorado High School Mountain Bike League and coaching the Green Mountain Composite High School Mountain Bike Team. It was so fun and so rewarding to see these kids get excited to race their bikes. Not to mention see our own kids who both really surprised us with not only how good they were right off the bat but also how much they loved it!

On the business front, I really had a productive couple of months preparing for the 2018 training season. Writing new training plans for our remote athletes, marketing our in-house Off-Season Training Program for our local athletes, and getting Personal Coaching clients dialed in for the new year ahead.

With all this solid work behind us and things back on track, I’ve finally turned the corner on gaining enthusiasm for my own training and racing goals for 2018.

After many weeks of chewing on things and talking through things with Kathy, I think I’ve narrowed down the bulk of my 2018 racing schedule. Assuming budgets are similar to years past, I’m still working through some final sponsorship details for 2018, here is what I have in mind for 2018:

Tentative 2018 Race Schedule

 

Now with some race plans written down, it’s time to get to work on rebuilding some fitness! 

So I have to be completely honest here… I don’t think I’ve ever been this “out of shape.” Seriously.

I started racing mountain bikes when I was 16 years old, and I haven’t stopped training or racing for anything longer than maybe 2 weeks at a stretch once a year. The funny thing is I haven’t really stopped riding over the last 3 months, but for the most part the riding I’ve done has been super short, super low-key, and there has been no intensity, much less racing… FOR 3 MONTHS!!

I may look the same, weigh basically the same, maybe be a little less tan; but I can really say that I feel slow, and any significant riding feels hard, and some of the last rides I did with the high school team really took a lot out of me.

Well we have to start somewhere, and getting started is often the hardest part! To officially kick the start of my training off, I jumped on the trainer for a Power Test to see exactly where I’m at and to reset my training zones. WOW that hurt! and the numbers were a little depressing.

But the good news is I can only go up from here and I plan to share with you over the next several months exactly how I go about improving these baseline numbers.

The testing I like to do is a bit different than the standard. You can read all the details in my recent two blog posts here: Testing Protocol, p.1 and Testing Protocol p.2. I’ve followed this protocol for the last 5 years so I have a good grip on what “good” is for me and these numbers are far from it. Here are the current details compared to my 2015 numbers leading up to my 15th place at Leadville 100:

  • 20:00 Aerobic Threshold Power @ 148 bpm
    • Fall 2017:  238w
    • Summer 2015:  274w
  • 1:00 Max Power
    • Fall 2017:  499w
    • Summer 2015:  529w
  • 2:00 Max Power
    • Fall 2017:  380w
    • Summer 2015:  454w
  • 4:00 Max Power
    • Fall 2017:  324w
    • Summer 2015:  382w
  • Fatigue Rate
    • Fall 2017:  8.7%
    • Summer 2015:  6.9%
  • This calculates an FTP of
    • Fall 2017:  247w (3.70 w/kg)
    • Summer 2015:  308w (4.71 w/kg)

What does all this mean? 

Simply put, I’m out of shape compared to a previous best power numbers in my 30s. These numbers compared to two years ago provide me with some goals to shoot for in my training. I have nine months to get back to these numbers, or slightly higher which is my goal. In 2015 I was actually coming off of serious back injury that limited my early winter training volume, and I was thinking I was going to race triathlon in that year, so my cycling base was pretty minimal in 2015. This leads me to believe that starting from a healthy starting point this year, and a full focus on the bike, I can exceed my 2015 numbers and perhaps even surpass my numbers from back in my 20s.

Where to start? 

From here, with baseline numbers in hand, I’m ready to get into focused training for November. I have two goals for the month:

  1. Get back to Strength Training
  2. Begin to rebuild my Aerobic Base

First move is getting back into regular strength work in the gym to begin to rebuild some strength. This is KEY for masters athletes (of which I am now!). Over the last several seasons I have found that progressively building strength in the back squat and deadlift exercises helps to improve the top end power numbers and resistance to injury. Combined with other dynamic strength movement to improve push-pull strength and core stability helps keep the body strong, healthy and more fatigue resistant. You can check out my Off-Season Strength Program to try for yourself on Training Peaks HERE.

On the bike, my focus will be on the opposite end… on aerobic training. I will slowly ramp up the volume with consistent regular riding, targeting my Aerobic Threshold by accumulating time in my AeT HR zone (138-147 bpm) and improving my pedaling efficiency through some specific cadence work and single-leg drills on the trainer. Both of these measures will help to improve my fatigue resistance and gradually lower my Fatigue Rate. You can check out my Off-Season Cycling Base Builder Program to try for yourself on Training Peaks HERE.

Ready, set, go… 

To really help me clear my mind and get back into training mode, I planned a “Training Camp Lite” in Arizona for the first week of November. Even though I don’t actually have the fitness to do tons of riding at the moment, getting away and into a new environment can be a super motivating and fun way to spark the motivation. I plan to ride everyday for 2-3 hours to get the ball of success rolling for 2018.

By following along with me this year, hopefully you can find a thing or two to implement to your own training and help your 2018 being a successful one as well!

Thanks for reading and I hope you decide to follow along for the 2018 season!

Cody Waite, Professional Off-Road Endurance Athlete & Coach
Follow me on Instagram & Facebook
Check out my Stock Training Plans, Custom Training Plans & Personal Coachingoptions to help you make the most of your training!
Looking Forward To 2018!

Looking Forward to 2018!

  • October 9, 2017
  • Blog

The “Summer of 2017” will go down as possibly the busiest/most hectic/most stressful summer for me of all time. What started out as solid winter of training for what was to be my “Swan Song” season on the XTERRA Pan-Am Tour as a professional, ended up including a car accident resulting in the “totaling” of our new Promaster Van, selling our home, buying a new home, moving, working through insurance stuff to get a new van, some family stress, coaching the Green Mountain High School Mountain Bike Team (this ended up being the highlight of the summer!), and finally settling into our new home all over the last 4 months. All of this left little time/energy/motivation to train, much less try and race. So after only one XTERRA Pan-Am Tour race back in May in Alabama, a handful of mountain bike races, including a Co-Ed Duo Team WIN at Firecracker 50 (with Kathy!!), my “season” came to a fizzling end in August.

Finally in September I was able to regroup a bit as we finally got our family settled into our new home, kids back to school, and have a great time training with and being a part of super fun High School MTB racing program. The dust began to settle some in my birthday month and I have been able to take a few deep breaths of having the stressful summer behind us and begin looking towards 2018.

Two big changes are occurring in 2018…

  1. I am taking a step back from triathlon and retiring from professional XTERRA racing.

  2. I turned 39 last month and will be able to race Masters 40+ in 2018, as I turn my full training/racing attention towards mountain bike racing.

XTERRA has been a wonderful experience for me the last 12 years and I am sure I will return to XTERRA again in the future. When I do, it will be when I train and race for the pleasure of the fitness you achieve in the sport. XTERRA racing has been the most enjoyable form of training and racing for me and when I return it will be in the older age-groups and for the experience of the process.

In between now and when I return to XTERRA, I have some lofty endurance mountain bike racing goals to check off. For the next three to fours years, I’ve decided that focusing on one sport and two activities (MTB & Strength Training) will work best with our current busy lifestyle as parents of three high-school aged girls and business owners.

Cycling is my true passion and I feel like I have at least a few more solid seasons of racing at the elite level… and along the way perhaps I snag some Masters Championships on the mountain bike.

So all that said, here are the following A-Priorty events on my 2018 racing calendar. These could change slightly, and I will surely be adding several more additional low-priority events to the mix, but for now these are the targets for the season ahead:

  • May: USA Cycling Marathon National Champs
  • July: Firecracker 50 (co-ed duo, defending champs w/ Kathy)
  • July: Leadville Stage Race
  • August: Leadville 100
  • August: Breck Epic (co-ed duo team w/ Kathy)

For my entire 2018 season, I plan to share my training progress, thoughts and racing experiences with those of you that are interested in rolling along with me.

The month of October  for me, as well as the majority of athletes I work with, is about getting back into a regular daily training pattern that includes re-adjusting to strength training (I let too much time go by w/o any strength work this summer!) and riding 5+ days per week. November is when my “official” 2018 training kicks off with some testing on the bike, and a highly structured training program including indoor trainer sessions, longer outdoor rides, and a progressive strength training build over the winter months. I’ll dig deeper into both of these training elements in future blog posts (goal is at least 2 posts per month). So stay tuned!!

If you’re training for XC or endurance MTB racing, or even triathlon and want to focus more on your bike this year, the core of this very same training program will become available to you to try for yourself, and following right along with me on your own, in the next 1-2 weeks. If this sounds like something you’d be interested in, take a look at my 2018 Remote Training Team program as something to consider for your 2018 training plan.

Thanks for reading and I hope you decide to follow along for the 2018 season!

Cody Waite, Professional Off-Road Endurance Athlete & Coach
Follow me on Instagram & Facebook
Check out my Stock Training Plans, Custom Training Plans & Personal Coaching options to help you make the most of your training!